L-Prize; Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prizes

L Prize Media Mentions


LightNOW
July 31, 2013
L Prize Winner Still Going Strong After 25,000 Hours
"Well, this is impressive–and Philips is already in a next generation from this original technology. The Department of Energy has reported the LED lamp from Philips Lighting North America that won [the] L Prize in the 60W replacement category has shown no falloff in light output after 25,000 hours of continuous lumen maintenance testing."

ESI-Africa.com
July 29, 2013
LED lamps at 100% after 25,000 hours
"Not only were they still running at 100% lumen output, but the colour was stable (with less than 0.002 change in chromaticity according to the CIE 1976 colour diagram) and all of the lamps survived stress tests which had seen off two thirds of the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) competitors."

Lux Review
July 4, 2013
Philips LED lamps still at 100% after 25,000 hours
"When the lamps reached 25,000 hours of operation in April this year, the results exceeded expectations. Not only were they still running at 100 per cent lumen output, but the colour was stable (with less than 0.002 change in chromaticity according to the CIE 1976 colour diagram) and all of the lamps survived stress tests which had seen off two thirds of the CFL competitors."

LEDs Magazine Webcast
May 23, 2013
Tear down and analysis of LED retrofit lamps, and examination of optimum approaches to SSL (note: registration is required to view the webcast video)
"This [Philips L Prize-winning] lamp has red LEDs in, and that's how it gets both very high efficacy and very high color rendering, color quality."

The Economist
April 1, 2013
Difference Engine: Lux aeterna
"The usual measure of a light source's ability to reproduce colours faithfully is the Colour Rendering Index (CRI). By convention, incandescent bulbs are assigned a CRI of 100. Cheap LEDs can have a CRI of 50 or less. A really good one–such as the $50 Philips LED bulb that won the Department of Energy's $10m 'L-Prize' for exceeding all the set requirements for a 60-watt-replacement–has a CRI of 93. Most LEDs have CRIs of 80 to 85."

MIT Technology Review
March 9, 2013
How to Choose an LED Light Bulb
"I decided I’d rather have the Philips L Prize bulb, which has a CRI of 93, in a spot by the front door where the light is on more often."

Ingenia
March 2013
Changing lightbulbs
"[Philips' L Prize entry] bulbs easily exceeded the metric for colour-quality, with anecdotal evidence suggesting that the human eye could not distinguish the difference in colour produced by this prizewinning LED lamp and an incandescent bulb, which is renowned for delivering uniform emission. . . .The judges of the L Prize also evaluated robustness. . . . all the LED-based bulbs passed this examination, while every CFL in the test failed."

LEDs Magazine
November 20, 2012
DOE updates the latest L Prize lamp test results, rebate offers
"The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released another update of its testing of the Philips Lighting LED 60W-equivalent retrofit lamp that won the L Prize. The tests have reached what the agency considers the equivalent of 18 years of household use with no failures. The DOE also released a summary of rebates available for the solid-state lighting (SSL) product that range as high as $20 per lamp."

Cool Tools
November 15, 2012
Best 60-watt LED bulb: Philips L Prize bulb
"This is the best household LED bulb at the moment. . . .Compared to other LED lightbulb replacements, this one is brighter, more efficient, better color light, smaller, easier to swap, and more affordable. . . .In short, the Philips L-Prize bulb is the best bulb if you want to start replacing those 60-watts or higher that you use a lot."

Architectural Lighting
September 14, 2012
L Prize Lumen Maintenance Report
"After the first 7,000 hours of run time, lumen maintenance predicted with 95 percent confidence was found to be 97.1 percent at 25,000 hours, higher than the L Prize lumen maintenance requirement of 70 percent (L70). In July, after the 18,000-hour mark was passed, the projected lumen maintenance was 97.8 percent at 25,000 hours. Additionally, there was very little change to overall light output, and chromaticity levels remained well within the L Prize criteria."

LED-Resource.com
September 14, 2012
Philips L-Prize Award Winning LED Bulb Review
"Philips’ L-Prize Award Winning LED Bulb is currently the best when it comes to LED technology, performance, and efficiency, but there are a couple issues worth noting. . . . While it may not be ideal to use these bulbs in recessed lighting for your living room at home, the Philips L-Prize Award Winning LED Bulb would be a good choice for extended or continuous operation. In these applications, the efficiency and performance of this LED bulb will make a significant impact on your next utility bill."

GreenLightMovement.com
September 10, 2012
What is the L Prize?
"The L Prize competition marks a monumental step in technological advancement. By creating this competition, the U.S. Department of Energy is acknowledging our need to pursue more environmentally friendly solutions. And the resulting bulb could save our nation 44 Billion pounds of carbon emissions every year."

ConsumerReports.org
August 23, 2012
Early tests of the Philips L Prize LED are illuminating
"In our initial tests of the Philips L Prize LED, the bulb instantly provided a warm and bright light, meeting its claim of 940 lumens. . . . making the L Prize LED the brightest 60-watt replacement we've seen. The bulb's Color Rendering Index (CRI) is around 93, also much higher than others we've tested. So it's much better at showing the true colors of furnishings. So far, so good."

Pocono Record
August 17, 2012
How do you rate on energy efficiency?
"If homeowners swap every 60-watt standard incandescent bulb for the L-Prize' 10-watt alternative LED bulb (which glows white when turned on), it could save the country about 35 terawatt-hours of electricity, or $3.9 billion in one year, and reduce carbon emissions by 20 million metric tons."

LED Light Review
June 2012
Philips 420224 L-Prize LED Light Bulb Review
"With the L-Prize bulb, Philips has struck a keen balance between warmth and clarity." (Recommended; 4 out of 5 stars)

Hartford Business Journal
May 28, 2012
Energy-themed technology helps in going green
"Technology companies continue to embrace going green with a vigorous emphasis on products that save energy with just a dash of products that will also make our lives more luxurious. In the former category is the frankly amazing Philips L Prize LED bulb, winner of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) competition."

Good Housekeeping
May 22, 2012
Philips L Prize LED Light Bulb—Efficiency That Can Save You Money
"If you want to make your own home or office space more energy efficient consider investing in LED bulbs. Although they're expensive, each bulb can save $150 over its 25-year life. Philips even offers a 6-year manufacturer's warranty."

Milford Daily News
April 29, 2012
Pay $50 for a light bulb? At least it will last 20 years
"Already, the utility Cape Light Compact is providing financial support to Cape stores to bring the price down $25. National Grid, NStar and other Massachusetts utilities are expected to follow suit, once the Environmental Protection Agency adds the award winner to the existing Energy Star lineup of CFL and LED bulbs–a certification expected in June."

Forbes
April 18, 2012
Would You Buy a Light Bulb That Lasts 20 Years?
"Its lifespan is an estimated 30,000 hours (more than 20 years when used four hours a day) and it produces 900 lumens of light while only consuming 10 watts of juice, making it 83 percent more efficient than standard 60-watt incandescents."

The Associated Press
April 16, 2012
Rebates to cut price of $60 LED bulb
"[The] price reflects the cost of the components, especially the top-notch chips, or diodes, that give off the light, and is the price commercial customers will pay. But the manufacturer, Netherlands-based Philips, is discounting it right away to $50 for consumers, and working on deals with electric utilities to discount it even further, by as much as $20 to $30. This means the bulb will cost anywhere from $20 to $60, depending on where it's found."

Energy Efficiency & Technology
March 26, 2012
L Prize back up and running for PAR 38 lamps
"The new [PAR 38] Competition uses the same vetting and testing procedures as in the old, along with the same U.S. sourcing requirements. But DoE has made some changes aiming to shorten the competition timeline and reduce testing costs— testing costs for DoE, not for entrants."

The Wall Street Journal
March 25, 2012
Green Light, Go!
"[The L Prize bulb]'s brighter than a traditional 60-watt incandescent bulb and is the most efficient omnidirectional LED bulb on the market. Despite its Day-Glo yellow finish, the bulb shines pure white when lighted. The L Prize bulb is the only omnidirectional LED bulb we'd recommend at the moment."

MEEA (unplugged blog)
March 20, 2012
Philips LED Lamp, Winner of DOE's L Prize, Now Available
"In partnership with the Merchandise Mart in Chicago, MEEA conducted field evaluations in a range of commercial and showroom settings. . . . The results are compelling: the LED lamps provided similar or better performance than the incumbent incandescent bulbs."

Energy Efficiency & Technology
February 10, 2012
Now you, too, can own an L Prize LED bulb
"Consumers can now own an LED-based bulb that has the equivalent of a 60-W incandescent bulb's lumen output. The vaunted DOE L-Prize winner from Philips . . . goes on sale this month."

AllThingsD
January 17, 2012
Picking the Brightest, Most Efficient Bulb
"By June, Philips Lighting North America will debut its L Prize Bulb, an LED bulb that was the first to win the Department of Energy's 'L Prize,' an award for energy efficiency. Designed to replace a 60-watt incandescent, the LED bulb consumes less than 10 watts, according to Philips. In rigorous testing, the Energy Department said, the bulb had a useful lifetime of more than 25,000 hours."

IEEE Spectrum magazine
January 2012
LED Bulbs for Less
"The passing of Edison's bulb has already been decreed, and which of the two alternatives will replace it is at last becoming clear. It will be the LED. . . . A glimpse of what's to come appeared this past August, when an LED lightbulb from Philips Lighting North America won the U.S. Department of Energy's $10 million Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize, better known as the L Prize."

CBS Sunday Morning
December 18, 2011
Let there be LEDs
"The answer for Philips was a bulb that just won a $10 million prize from the Department of Energy. While it may look like those orange bug lights of old, this is an LED Philips says all but replicates the warm glow of the incandescent."

Education Week (Sputnik blog)
September 30, 2011
How Many Education Innovators Does It Take to Change a Light Bulb?
"Investing in [the Department of Education's Investing in Innovation Fund (i3)], the Obama Administration's investment in the whole innovation pipeline from development to scale-up, is a bit like the L-Prize, in that programs that obtain positive achievement outcomes in rigorous, third-party evaluations may qualify for large grants to help them disseminate their programs."

Challenge.gov
September 19, 2011
Challenge.gov 1st anniversary video
The L Prize competition is featured on the government's challenge.gov website, which brings new competitions and innovations to the public, as well as on the site's first-anniversary video.

Cleantech Authority
September 8, 2011
The Race For Light Bulb Supremacy
"Created in 2008 to jumpstart the LED race, the 'L Prize,' or Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize, has been a loose benchmark for both specifications and productivity inside the heating LED market. Philips recently took home the first L-Prize, surviving DOE's rigorous tests with a bulb expected to hit stores in 2012."

electroindustry (ei) Magazine
September 2011
Philips Lighting Awarded L Prize
"In addition to a $10 million award, the winning entry is expected to benefit from promotions of it by many utility companies and the federal government as a replacement for the 60-watt incandescent bulb."

LEDs Magazine
September 2011
Philips wins L Prize for 60W-replacement LED lamps
"After 18 rigorous months of testing Philips' candidate LED lamp, the US Department of Energy (DOE) announced on August 3 that Philips has won the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) competition in the 60W-replacement-lamp category. LEDs Magazine recently sat down with Jim Brodrick of the DOE to discuss the L Prize."

EDN
August 25, 2011
Philips wins $10M L Prize for LED-based 60W replacement bulb
"Philips Lighting North America has won the first award under the Department of Energy's L Prize competition."

Architectural Lighting
August 23, 2011
L Prize Winner Announced
"The competition, outlined as a provision of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act and officially launched in 2008, is the first sponsored by the federal government that encourages the implementation of high-performance, energy-efficient lighting, as well as the research initiatives involved with such endeavors, with a specific focus on solid-state lighting products."

Wired
August 19, 2011
The Future of Light Is the LED
"Part of the reason the L Prize judges took two years to declare Philips the winner is that LED bulbs are so novel. Though the performance standards are clear, they're also incredibly high. . . ."

Semiconductor Today
August 17, 2011
LUXEON Rebel LEDs power L Prize winning retrofit bulb
"Earlier this month, Philips Lighting North America announced that it had won the 60-watt replacement bulb category of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) competition, which challenges the lighting industry to develop high performance, energy-saving replacements for conventional light bulbs."

MarketWatch
August 15, 2011
LUXEON LEDs Take Retrofit Bulbs to the Next Level–Trusted
"LUXEON Rebel LEDs, the world's most widely used illumination grade LEDs, are at the heart of the winning L Prize bulb from Philips as well as dozens of different retrofit bulbs being sold around the world today."

WhiteHouse.gov (blog)
August 12, 2011
Weekly Wrap-Up: Common Sense Solutions
"Thomas Edison would be amazed. The conventional light bulb now has some serious competition."

tED Green Room
August 11, 2011
Philips Wins DOE Prize
"On August 3, the Department of Energy announced Philips as the winner of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) in the 60-watt replacement bulb category."

Green Lodging News
August 10, 2011
Philips Wins Department of Energy L Prize
"The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Philips Electronics the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) in recognition of being the first company to successfully develop an LED replacement for the common 60-watt incandescent light bulb."

ThomasNet News
August 9, 2011
DOE awards first L Prize for LED lighting technology
"Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy, announced that the first L Prize for LED development and manufacturing goes to Philips Lighting Electronics North America."

Residential Lighting
August 8, 2011
Philips Lighting Wins L Prize
"The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced the first recipient of the prestigious L Prize competition on Aug. 3, naming Philips Lighting North America as the winner of the 60W replacement category."

Photonics
August 8, 2011
Philips Lighting Wins DOE's First L Prize
"Philips' winning energy-efficient alternative to the 60-W lightbulb cleared a high bar for performance and quality, passing product performance and lumen depreciation testing conducted by independent laboratories and field assessments performed by L Prize partners."

Werner Electric Supply
August 8, 2011
Philips Lighting North America Winner in L Prize Competition
"The Department of Energy Announces Philips Lighting North America as a winner of their L Prize Competition in the category for 60 watt replacement bulbs!!"

Electric Co-op Today
August 8, 2011
Better Bulb
"After 18 months of intensive testing, the U.S. Department of Energy has announced the winner of its Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize competition."

ElectronicsWeekly.com
August 5, 2011
Philips lab makes record-breaking LED replacement for 60W bulb
"Philips has won a category in the US government's competition to demonstrate the highest efficiency high quality lighting."

Scientific American
August 4, 2011
Philips Wins Prestigious Department of Energy Prize
"On August 3, 2011, DOE officially announced Philips Electronics North America as the first winner of the L Prize competition with an LED replacement for the 60-watt incandescent bulb."

NEMA
August 4, 2011
NEMA Hails DOE Award of First L Prize for LED Lighting Technology and Manufacturing
"Today U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced the first award of the L Prize for development and manufacturing of energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) lighting to Philips Lighting Electronics North America."

Energy Efficiency News
August 4, 2011
Philips' bright idea wins $10m prize
"A light-emitting diode bulb developed by Dutch electronics company Philips has won a Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) from the US Department of Energy (DOE)."

The New York Times (Green blog)
August 3, 2011
Philips Wins Energy Department's Lighting Prize
"Philips, the Netherlands-based consumer electronics giant, is now $10 million richer, having just won the L Prize, awarded by the federal Department of Energy in a contest to invent the next generation of solid-state lighting."

LEDs Magazine
August 3, 2011
DOE announces that Philips has won the 60W-replacement-lamp L Prize
"After an 18-month evaluation process including field and lab testing, the DOE has announced that Philips Lighting North America has won the 60W-replacement-lamp category in the L Prize competition that's focused on the development of energy-efficient SSL."

Fast Company
August 3, 2011
The Department Of Energy Reveals The Light Bulb Of The Future
"This Philips LED bulb is the winner of the DOE's $10 million competition to develop a low-cost, energy efficient, high-performance replacement for the incandescent bulb."

National Geographic
August 3, 2011
Philips Wins L Prize, but the Race Is Still on for a Better Bulb
"With a device that resembles a segmented lemon, but glows like an ordinary living room, Philips Lighting North America captured a much-awaited $10 million U.S. government prize, a race to produce the first super high-efficiency replacement for the world's most popular lightbulb."

Consumer Reports
August 3, 2011
Philips wins DOE's lighting prize plus $10 million
"Folks, we have a winner. In the ultimate battle of the bulbs, Philips has won the L Prize, also known as the Department of Energy's Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize."

Reuters
August 3, 2011
Philips Wins L Prize, but the Race Is Still on for a Better Bulb
"With a device that resembles a segmented lemon, but glows like an ordinary living room, Philips Lighting North America captured a much-awaited $10 million U.S. government prize, a race to produce the first super high-efficiency replacement for the world's most popular lightbulb."

CNET
August 3, 2011
Philips brings home 'L Prize' with efficient LED lamp
"Philips' 60-watt equivalent LED bulb, expected in stores next year, wins the L Prize for the most energy-efficient and long-lasting lighting product."

Medill News Service
August 3, 2011
Philips wins L Prize, but race still on for better bulb
"With a device that resembles a segmented lemon, but glows like an ordinary living room, Philips Lighting North America captured a much-awaited $10 million U.S. government prize, a race to produce the first super high-efficiency replacement for the world's most popular lightbulb."

LED Professional
August 3, 2011
Department of Energy Announce Philips as Winner of L Prize Competition
"Innovations in residential and commercial lighting products such as those encouraged by the L Prize expand the lighting choices available to consumers and support the Department's efforts to reduce our Nation's energy use, create manufacturing jobs for U.S. workers, and save money for American families and business owners."

LightNOW
August 3, 2011
DOE Announces Philips Lighting North America As First Winner Of L Prize Competition
"The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that Philips Lighting North America has won the 60W replacement bulb category of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) competition."

Lightboard
August 3, 2011
Philips wins $10M L Prize for LED-based 60W replacement bulb
"Philips Lighting North America has won the first award under the Department of Energy's L-Prize competition."

ZDNet
August 3, 2011
LED lighting smackdown: Philips snags LED lightbulb prize, Cree spotlights prototype
"Despite waning support from the federal government for lightbulb efficiency standards, innovation in the LED replacement lighting segment continues."

Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES)
August 2011
Philips CEO Discusses L Prize Win
"Last week DOE announced the winner of the 60-W replacement category of its Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) competition, which aims to find a replacement for the 60-W incandescent bulb. . . . Afterwards, [Zia] Eftekhar reflected on the competition, Philips' new L Prize bulb and what it's like to win $10 million."

Saving Energy at Home
August 2011
Let's End the Useless Debate about Light Bulbs
"We can't afford to get bogged down arguing about light bulbs when we need the equivalent of 'L Prize' winners [in] so many different categories, from smokestack scrubbers and cleaner fracking technology to more affordable ground-source heat pumps and updated vo-tech programs that train the next generation of solar system installers."

Learn more about solid-state lighting at the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Web site

Last Updated: July 31, 2013
Security & Privacy